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Commonwealth War Cemetery Arnhem Oosterbeek

(Netherlands, the - Guelders - Oosterbeek)

The Commonwealth War Cemetery Arnhem Oosterbeek, also known as the Airborne Cemetery, contains the graves of most of those killed during the September landings, and many of those killed in later fighting in the area.

There are now 1,680 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 245 of the burials are unidentified and two casualties are commemorated by special memorials. There are also 73 Polish, 3 Dutch and 3 non-war (former CWGC employees) graves in the cemetery.

Significant about this cemetery is the fact that a part of the Polish war graves is located separately at the left and right of the entrance. This is related to the year 1946 and the upcoming Cold War. Polish soldiers who had perished were due to be transported back to Poland from Driel, The Netherlands, but the now communist authorities blocked this transport, as these Polish fighters had worked with the British Allies. The bodies were returned to The Netherlands to be buried in Oosterbeek. The cemetery there only had room left at the edge of the fields.

Click for more information on the overview at the bottom of the page.

Source

  • Text: Lennard Bolijn
  • Photos: Arjan Vrieze

Address and contactinformation

Address:
Van Limburg Stirumweg
Oosterbeek
WWII grade:
100%
Rating:
100%

Also on this site

Plaquette Britse en Poolse Veteranen 1944 Oosterbeek

Where is it?

 

Amongst others, the following persons are buried here or mentioned on the Wall of Missing (Overview)

Bakhuys Roozeboom, August Fernand Marie
* July 10th, 1922
† September 19th, 1944
Plot: 1 Row: A Grave: 6
Des Voeux, Sir, William Richard de Bacquencourt
* December 27th, 1911
† September 20th, 1944
Plot: 6 Row: C Grave: 10
Slesicki, Stanislaw
* March 29th, 1907
† September 22nd, 1944
Plot: 34 Row: A Grave: 15

Click for more persons...

Visitor reactions

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Reactions

There is the same feeling, while looking at places were people lay, after dying in a conflict.

Its difficult to mantain a non visible emotion.

This cementery looks well mantained, and with nice details in the stones marking each grave.

War is almost over in Europe, save for the criminal acts of terrorism and ethnic conflicts.
Much to do in others parts of the world.
By: Ángel M. Salcedo Oliver
City: Zaragoza (España)
Date and time: 30-12-2008 07:26:25